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Sunday, July 30, 2006

Cerebrogenesis (6)

(A small edition this week due to a massive amount of reading I've been doing for various school-related projects leaving little time to peruse the blogosphere.)

  • Using Privilege to Make the Oppressed Look Like the Oppressor by tekanji. I've been really linking her stuff, but that's only because she's been churning out some great material on the whole debate regarding race/racism in the feminist community and surrounding nubian. Since I haven't been following the debate (and I'm not inclined to get involved in "she said" stuff here), I haven't had much to say, but it's nice to read other, good commentaries.
  • Flipping the Yellow Pages, an article at Tripmaster Monkey about the racism of the Great Ten and the general screwed-up representation of Asian Americans in comics. I am incredibly glad to read another Asian American speaking out against the problematic treatment we receive from the comic book industry. In related news, UBC released a study showing that Asian stereotypes plague not just comic books but video games as well: in video games, Asian males are predominantely represented as yellow-skinned victims or Kung-fu warriors. I'm curious to understand why the study focused on Asian men in video games when the study could've studied both men and women and probably gotten a better understanding of Asian stereotypes in general.
  • 10 Things You Can Do, a list of 10 things women can do to break stereotypes and combat negative images.
  • An Image Popular in Films Raise Some Eyebrows in Ads, an NY Times article dissecting the stereotype of the loud, sassy, boisterous, overweight Black woman. I have noticed this stereotype recurring recently and it has made me distinctly uncomfortable because it seems to play off of the Other-izing of Black women for White amusement, and let us not forget that despite the tone of the piece, the fat Black woman in the role of servitude towards the White protagonist is nothing new: remember that the first Black person to win an Oscar won it while playing the overweight Mammy to Scarlett O'Hara in Gone with the Wind.

4 Comments:

Anonymous Adam said...

I've been meaning write this before, but I appreciate all the time you put into these cerebrogenesis lists! The word is freaking awesome, and the blog writings that you highlight are always top notch.

Thanks again!

8/01/2006 10:04:00 AM  
Blogger Cocacy said...

These are some great links. I'm especially thankful for the NY Times link to overweight Black women. Have you seen Shadowboxer? Mo'Nique's portrayal as an obese crack addict is extremely disturbing to me. Thanks again for your wonderful blog postings! :)

8/01/2006 11:45:00 AM  
Blogger Jenn said...

thank you both for reading and i'm glad you enjoy the links! i haven't seen shadowboxer, but i suppose i will have to, now!

8/01/2006 02:19:00 PM  
Anonymous philly jay said...

Is that Tripmaster Monkey place more of a comedy site almost like the onion, or is it just just me?Still brings up interesting ideas though.

I was talking to a friend who brought up the asian male issue in comics(he's from japan himself) his stance was, unless you're the majority(white in america), any nonwhite character in general is not going to be taking as seriously as the white characters, and is more often there for either comedy relief, or to spice things up.He tried to compare a nonjapanese character in a japanese comic (or manga) to emphisize his point.I disagreed (being me :) ) at least with the american part.There is some truth to it, but not completely.I agreed with the nonjapanese in japanese comics part though.

Now, the whole sassy overweight black woman thing.A LOT of black people accept the image when it's done by other black people, which bothers me more than a white person pushing the image.And don't get me started on the overweight issue.Who was the writer of the article trying to fool?Full figured is just a nice way of not calling someone what they really are, FAT.

8/01/2006 03:00:00 PM  

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